Hi there  travelling buddies.

With red stained shoes we leave a piece of our hearts with Broome. I do hope my readers enjoyed it as we did. But our trip continues and with a joyful spring in our step to see what comes next for us, we travel back down the coast. But the road already travelled was not at all what we expected. On our way up to Broome, we met lots of like minded campers, and the camp sites were cooler then, with fewer flies. However, we do not advise the unseasoned traveller to make this trip during this time. The overnight free camp sites were a bit daunting when empty. Some were stinking hot dust pits, and what made them worse, they were pest ridden. It became obvious we were the only attraction for miles. As for the roads, well, it must be the time of year to patch roads because we were held up by roads works on many occasions. The upside was, there was very little traffic which made it easier to get in and out of the petrol stations quickly.

We took a couple of photos as we drove through from the Kimberley’s and Pilbara to get to the Gascoyne region. Here, nature still surprised us with some areas still quite green, yet in others, the lanscape screams for a drink. If not for the spinifix, some of the mountain ranges in the Pilbara would be just coffee coloured rock on rustc dusty ground. Gascoyne did not dissapoint. It was totally different to drive through with short Acacia shrubs and dark green mounds of chenopods. No trees, and very few hills, yet the rise and fall of the land was much like the sea with the swells and the waves that roll in and out with the tides.

Exmouth

To be able to travel is such a blessing. Each town and its community stands alone and proud. This one so diverse with the multi-million-dollar homes, their grand boats tied up on their private jetties, to the less fortunate yet not without class, who live closer to the shops and industrial area. Caravan parks and holiday units are scattered and spread out spaciously in between. Then there are the beaches, boat ramps, a lighthouse and the list goes on. We had only booked in for three days but stayed six, and if we could have spared the time and cash, we would have stayed another six. Exmouth is worthy of a visit, not just a stopover and a look-see. 

Let’s start with the wealthy side of town. Yes, my eyes are green and am so right now wishing for a lotto win to buy one of these mansions. 

The Mantaray resort in this new area.

City Beach and boat storage adjacent and another display of grandeur

Jurabi Turtle Centre

Read about the life of a turtle…

Our search for turtles on the beach.

No sightings but was a whole lot of fun.

VLAMINGH HEAD Lighthouse

and view. 

BUNDAGI BEACH

At the tip of Exmouth, we found a quaint coffee shack with the yummiest of fresh cakes and so much more. Overlooking “to die for views” we had morning tea and after, took in the amazing communication site dedicated to the late prime minister, Harold Holt, who went missing while swimming in our unpredictable ocean waters in Victoria. To take on office, and to have the nation son’s and daughter’s on your shoulders as they are shipped off to war, to save us here in Australia, must have been a truly heart-wrenching time. Bless all those ripped from life by war.

KAYAK’s maiden voyage 

Last but not least, after carting the Kayak around with us for almost a year, hubby finally got time to take it out for some fun. Now remember, he has had a couple of lower back ops so I had the camera ready to record an “I told you so moment” chuckle. Well, not really, but I was hoping for some entertainment and was not dissapointed. (My gut hurt from laughing so hard) 

Coral Bay

What a pretty location for a holiday! After experiencing little to no campers up north, arriving in Coral Bay had us flabbergasted. The caravan park was packed, and the gorgeous turquoise beach was humming. Great place for families with kids as the bay is secluded and a refreshing inlet allows bathers and bodyboarders to enjoy a swim, without the usual stress of sharks and crocs found outside this quaint-coastal-getaway. We almost booked in to stay, but price per night was double our normal budget, so we ate lunch, admired the view and toddled off a little after.

Carnarvon

Looked on map and noticed a bridge leading from Carnarvon to Pelican Island. Best take a gander we thought. But travelling buddies, the destinations are never what you expect so expect the unexpected if you came here. There was no water seperating this little Island and in a blink of an eye we were on it and almost around half of it. The mile long jetty was closed it was in such disrepair and the only thing to look at were big ugly signs and some old train equipment. So we made the most of the water being so far from us and enjoyed a cuppa as we watched the animal life busy with their day. To sum up Carnavan, walking around and driving through, it did seem very tired and in some parts, needed to be repaired and could be more RV friendly if they want to attract tourists/travellers to stay. However, in saying that, the banana growers out of town had us in awe of the kilometers of agricultural land well used and was bananarific.

Well, it’s time for Shebbie to rest up for a week in Kalbarri. The old travelling bones are not as they used to be.

(Kalbarri is a coastal town in the Mid West region located 592 km (368 mi) north of Perth, WA. The town is found at the mouth of the Murchison River.)

So, hope you enjoyed our little trip through the Gascoyne as we did. Take care over the festive season if you’re hitting the road. With no overseas travel yet, there will be plenty who will be joining you. Including us. To those we leave behind, it was lovely to meet you and look forward to another catch up if we cross paths again. Thanks for the memories xx

 

Shebbie out!

3 Comments

  1. Karen Dunmore

    Thanks for sharing pictures. I loved my trips to Carnarvon and Paul and I love Kalbarri so enjoy your stop there as well. Getting closer to Perth. Safe travels🥰❤

    Reply
  2. Shebbie

    If you would like to leave a message, we have added the submit button that was invisible for some unknown reason.
    Love to hear from you,
    Cheers Shebbie

    Reply
    • debbiebehan

      Thanks Shaun

      Reply

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